Can You Live in Your House During a Renovation?

by Shelley Frost
A home undergoing renovation is shown with one side of the room torn up due to the work being done while the other side remains intact and livable, renovation, home renovation, windows, natural light, flooring, missing floorboards, ladder

Can you stay in your home during a remodeling project? And more than that — do you really want to?

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Remodeling comes with a lot of noise, dust and inconveniences, especially if you're remodeling your kitchen or bathroom. Whether you can stay at your house during a remodel depends largely on the scope of the job and the work you're doing.

Can You Live in Your House While It's Being Renovated?

You can stay in your home when remodeling the inside of the house in many cases. Extensive remodel jobs might require you to move out, or you might prefer to stay somewhere else during the renovation for convenience.

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During What Types of Projects Can You Stay in Your Home?

You can often stay in your home when you're only remodeling one or two spaces or when you remodel a space you don't currently use, such as an unfinished basement or attic. You can usually work around those rooms and modify your routine to live in the spaces that aren't under renovation. Some examples include:

  • Finishing a basement
  • Remodeling a bedroom
  • Remodeling a bathroom if you have at least one other bathroom
  • Updating your kitchen
  • Painting
  • Tiling

During What Types of Projects Will You Need to Leave?

Projects that involve most or all of the house might require you to leave, at least for a little while. You might also leave if any of the construction work would be a risk to your health or safety. Examples of renovation projects that might require you to move out include:

  • Complete remodels
  • Exterior work that would leave an opening leading outside, putting you at risk of burglary
  • Remodeling your only bathroom
  • Projects requiring extensive downtime for plumbing or electrical systems
  • Renovating an older home that might have lead paint or asbestos
  • Any remodeling when you have young children or pets that could get in the way or injured
  • Most projects if you have a family member with respiratory issues

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Tips For Staying at Your House While Remodeling

Planning to stay in your home during the renovation? These tips can make it easier:

  • Make alternative plans. If you're remodeling your kitchen, move your fridge to the garage, set up a mini fridge and create a mini-kitchen with a microwave and hot plate in another room. Set up new sleeping arrangements if you're remodeling a bedroom.
  • Control dust. Ask your contractor if they have a dust control system they can use. You might also cover HVAC vents, open windows in work areas and tape plastic sheets to contain the remodeling area.
  • Change your routine. You might need to simplify your routine to account for the renovations if you stay at your house.
  • Create boundaries. Work with your contractor to ensure the workers stick to an agreed-upon work schedule or communicate changes with you early. Establish areas where workers aren't allowed to go if you're only remodeling a few spaces.
  • Set up barriers. If you have kids or pets, find ways to keep them out of the remodeling area. Gates can work, or you might lock the doors to the remodeling areas if they're separate rooms.

Some people choose to move out for safety or health reasons. Lots of contractors might be coming in and out of the home, so you might want to move your valuables and your family out of the home. You also might not want to deal with the dust and construction noise, especially if you have kids or if anyone in your house has respiratory issues.

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Elocal Editorial Content is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Editorial Content should not be used as a substitute for advice from a licensed professional in your state reviewing your issue. The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the eLocal Editorial Team and other third-party content providers do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of eLocal or its affiliate companies. Use of eLocal Editorial Content is subject to the

Website Terms and Conditions.

The eLocal Editorial Team operates independently of eLocal USA's marketing and sales decisions.

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