Is Your Toilet Running? Well, Then Ya Better Go Fix It!

by John Warbuck
A birds eye view of a white toilet with the seat down as it flushes, flushing toilet, toilet, flush, flushing, bathroom, restroom, residential toilet, toilet bowl, toilet seat, tile floor, porcelain toilet, porcelain, water

Are you hearing running water coming from the bathroom constantly only to discover a toilet running? When you open your water bill the next month, does it come as a shock to your wallet?

Read More Plumbing Articles

A running toilet may be your problem. In most cases, you can get your toilet operating the way it’s supposed to in just a few minutes. Here’s what to do.

Why Does My Toilet Keep Running?

There are several reasons your toilet may be running continuously, so understanding how the components in your tank work can help. The handle you flush with is connected to a flapper so that the water is drained from the tank to flush the contents of your toilet when you flush. A pump then begins to refill the tank until it reaches the fill level indicated by a device called a float.

If any of these components isn’t operating effectively, it could cause a running toilet. Aside from the nuisance of hearing your toilet run, this problem can cost you a lot of money each month. Running toilets waste a lot of water, and you could be wasting hundreds of gallons of water per day if you don’t identify and repair the issue.

Delivery VanHome
Talk to a Pro
(877) 468-1525

How Do I Fix a Running Toilet?

The tools you will need are a screwdriver and a wrench. If your flapper is broken, you may need to purchase a new one.

If your toilet won’t stop running, the first step is to drain the toilet water. Disconnect the water supply and flush the toilet. The tank will drain completely.  You can then follow these steps in order to find and fix the problem.

1. The Flapper Chain

The flapper chain is the chain that’s connected to the flush handle and pulls the flapper at the bottom of your tank. Adjust the chain so that the flapper rises when you move the handle and then forms a seal when the handle is in its upright position.

2. The Flapper

There are a few reasons your flapper may be making your toilet run constantly. The first is that it’s become dirty and won’t seal completely. Fixing this issue is as simple as cleaning the flapper and putting it back into place.

Your flapper could also be damaged. Hardware stores often sell universal flappers that are designed to fit most toilets. You could also check the manufacturer’s website for the toilet you own to see if you can find the correct flapper.

Installing the new flapper is easy. You put it into place and attach the chain at the correct length.

3. The Flush Valve

It’s possible that the flush valve is the problem, rather than any of the other components in your toilet tank. This device is what holds the flapper into place. You should contact a plumber if you notice your flush valve leaking. You may need to replace the valve or spring for a new toilet, and the plumber can give you the best advice.

More Related Articles:

4. The Float

Inside the toilet tank is a float that tells the water pump when to stop working. Having the correct water level in your tank is important because it conserves water while making sure you have enough water pressure to empty the contents of your toilet with each flush. Setting the float too high forces the toilet to keep running because the overflow tube will remove water once it exceeds a certain level.

The method for adjusting your float varies. If it’s an older model, it could be as simple and bending the rod the float attaches to. Newer models have screws or clips you can use to adjust the float setting. To ensure your float is at the right level, reconnect your water supply and pay attention to how high the water rises after you flush.

5. The Fill Valve

The float is attached to the fill valve and determines when the water pump stops filling the water tank. Sometimes, the float could be set correctly, but the fill valve is disorientated. You can use a screwdriver to adjust the fill valve so that the water level matches the float setting.

Call a Plumber

If these simple fixes don’t solve the problem, there could be something more serious going on with your toilet. It’s time to call a plumber if you’re unable to solve the problem with your own knowledge or if you notice water leaking near the toilet while it’s running.

Elocal Editorial Content is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Editorial Content should not be used as a substitute for advice from a licensed professional in your state reviewing your issue. Systems, equipment, issues and circumstances vary. Follow the manufacturer's safety precautions. The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the eLocal Editorial Team and other third-party content providers do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of eLocal or its affiliate companies. Use of the Blog is subject to the

Website Terms and Conditions.

The eLocal Editorial Team operates independently of eLocal USA's marketing and sales decisions.

1
2
3

ProFindr

Get the number of a local pro sent to your phone.

Please enter a service.

Elocal Editorial Content is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Editorial Content should not be used as a substitute for advice from a licensed professional in your state reviewing your issue. The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the eLocal Editorial Team and other third-party content providers do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of eLocal or its affiliate companies. Use of eLocal Editorial Content is subject to the

Website Terms and Conditions.

The eLocal Editorial Team operates independently of eLocal USA's marketing and sales decisions.

Click to Call A ProQuick, easy, and commitment-free connection. Call now! (888) 284-6285