What elements are overused in home improvement?

23
759

Our Featured Question by Patricia Davis Brown of Dig This Design: Do you ever walk into a client’s house and think to yourself, “Oh no, not this again!” We’ve all seen some overplayed home improvement trends and wished that they’d had an early grave.

Whether it’s a shoddy product, an unattractive design element, or an overused material, we want to know what home improvement trends to avoid. We’re turning to our Blog-Off experts for the final word on the issue…

Why We’re Asking:

Patricia Davis Brown of the blog Dig This Design suggested our 14th Blog-Off question. Patricia Davis Brown Designs, LLC comprises of a network of organizations, including the Dig This Design blog, Professional Kitchen and Bath Plans (a virtual design company), and PDB Home Store (an online home furnishings site). Through her blog, Dig This Design, Davis Brown offers design tips, and discusses art and fashion. Furthermore, Dig This Design gives insider’s tips on the products of companies such as Sub Zero Wolf, BRIZZO and GE Monogram.

The trends of the home improvement industry follow along with the arrivals of new materials, concepts, and technologies. For example, the heavy use of granite for countertops were once very popular. However, in the last decade there has been a decrease in popularity of the material because of overuse. Styles are now moving away from the busy patterns in granite to newer, more monochromatic materials. Granite may make a comeback, but are there any other elements of home design that professionals wish they’d never have to see again?

So experts, it’s time to weigh in:

What elements have been overused in the home improvement industry?

With all the new technologies and materials available to us today, do you think there are some that were a mistake to make?
Are there any products, principles, or other elements that you consider passé?
What are the worst or most astonishing elements you’ve seen in current home design?
Is there anything you think homeowners should stay away from, whether it be an inefficient product (or use of a product) or an unattractive design element?

Experts, post your answers in the comment field below!

Comments are closed.