red flags

What are red flags for home professionals?

Hiring a professional to work in your house is a touchy thing. You want to get the best work for your dollar, but not all of the “professionals” out there will give you the kind of quality work you’re looking for, or even be honest about how much it will cost you in the end. To help homeowners figure out how to tell the true professionals from the scam artists, we turned to our home industry experts to find out what the red flags are for the home expert industry. Here’s a list of the biggest red flags they pointed out for us.

Red Flags for Home Industry Professionals

1. Lack of a track record: Any professional worth working with will have references for you to check, so you can see the quality of their previous work. If you can’t find any information about a professional’s work online, or they’re cagey about giving you references, you should be very suspicious.
2. Get it in writing: Some old-timers in the industry might advocate their word as their bond, but as a homeowner you should always get the plan in writing. A written contract can save you a lot of heart ache, and a true professional shouldn’t have a problem with it.
3. The contractor is late: Showing up late to a first meeting is a huge red flag for a contractor, just like it would be in any other situation. If they don’t respect your time or make an effort to behave professionally on your first meeting, don’t expect that to change after you’ve hired them. That goes double if they swear excessively, smoke, wear shoes into your house without slip covers, or otherwise behave unprofessionally.
4. Be suspicious of too-low prices: It’s tempting to go off lowest price offered when you’re looking for a home professional, but you should think twice before picking that one outlier company. Ask yourself: what corners are they cutting to get a price that’s so much lower than anybody else is offering?
5. They want you to get the materials: If you don’t have a lot of experience hiring home professionals, you might not know that home professionals usually include material costs in their quotes. If a professional is asking you to do the buying up front, it means that they don’t have a good relationship with supply houses and can’t get credit there. This means they aren’t on top of their finances, and you might find yourself holding the short end of the stick if you hire them.
6. A disorganized truck: If you get a chance to see the contractor’s work space and it’s disorganized or not well cared for, it’s an indication that they are not taking their work seriously or professionally. A disorganized professional will treat your space the same way they treat their truck. If you don’t want to find your house littered with tools, don’t hire someone who’s disorganized about their work.

Keep an eye out for these early signs that the contractor you’re considering hiring isn’t a true professional. And for the professionals looking to hire tradespeople to work with, we have one additional tip: don’t hire anybody who hasn’t kept up on their education since entering the business. Getting the appropriate training up front is important, but the home industry changes all the time, and what was sufficient training a few years ago may not be up to snuff now. Staying up-to-date with codes is the bare minimum here. A tradesperson who goes above and beyond to keep up with their education is someone who cares about doing the best possible work, and that’s a person you will not regret working with.